The High Performance Formula Drives Employee Success

 In Business Success, Leadership, Leadership Development, leadership training, Leadership trust, Rick Conlow

The high performance formula is a recipe for greatness. This means creating a place where employees want to a good job, routinely go the extra mile, improve productivity, and are highly engaged in their jobs. The formula represents areas where managers can initiate positive behaviors. As a result, employees respond with excellent if not great results.

The High-performance Formula Defined

The High Performance Formula Drives Employee SuccessBottom-line, high performance is about achieving extraordinary outcomes. This means reaching and exceeding company goals. It also means finding ways to become consistently better. Eventually, it turns into setting new company standards and redefining what is possible. Good Bosses inspire people to achieve high performance. They have learned this high-performance formula if only by experience. As a result, the formula guides them in creating extraordinary teamwork, too. It is a function of paying attention to employee’s need and want to do a good job. Bad Bosses do not know what to do or do not really care about it. They may talk about it, but it never gets done on a sustainable basis.

Clear expectations Starts the Formula

Great performance starts with clear expectations and goals. It is all about these questions:

  • What are our goals and priorities?
  • How are we going to work together?
  • What is the plan to succeed?

This must be discussed with each employee. Also, with the whole team.  The high-performance formula requires genuine communication, collaboration, and care.

Competence Drives High Performance

Competence means the employee’s job skills and knowledge. In any profession, the best performers continually practice getting better at their trade. A concert pianist puts in untold hours to play with effortless grace. Disney provides more training to 18- to 20-year-olds than most managers ever receive. All baseball players prepare in the off season and spring training. In addition, during the regular season they continue to practice before games. Therefore, upgrading employee competence is a key component of the high-performance formula.

The High Performance Formula Drives Employee SuccessTo compete today, managers need to relentlessly educate and train their employees. Companies should hire competent people first, but then you need to keep them learning. “World-class” training is the equivalent of 5% of payroll budget. Most managers do not have that kind of budget or a training department. Yet, they do not really need to. Managers do need to learn to train and partner with their HR teams where appropriate. Practically speaking employees need weekly, monthly, and quarterly training. It is not always teaching people what they do not know. In addition, it is about fine-tuning their current skills. Also, it is upgrading what they can do. The best companies provide an average of 60 hours of training per employee per year. Most of all, this on-going training improves performance.

Commitment to High Performance

Commitment involves employee willingness and desire to do the job. Most people have this to a certain degree because they want a paycheck. It has been said that the number one reason people go to work is because the alarm went off. While that is stretching the truth, it emphasizes a key principle. People go to make a living. Moreover, they are not doing the job for free. The work and the income stimulate the motivation to do the job well.

However, that is not enough today. Business is tough and competitive. A manager must pay attention to what motivates people. Therefore, this includes doing team meetings, giving recognition, and listening to problems. Consequently, these actions build trust and positive relationships. The high-performance formula defines a proven roadmap for this.

A High-Performance Climate

A supportive environment inspires people to do better. Certainly, good bosses pay attention to this. Bad bosses do not. Climate involves:

  • Positive, not a negative atmosphere
  • Clear goals, not vague visions
  • Listening, not telling
  • Recognition, not criticism
  • Teamwork, not isolationism
  • Defined values, not rhetoric
  • A sense of purpose, not business as usual
  • Fun and having a good time, not boring and routine
  • Innovative, not same old same old
  • Integrity, not disreputable practices
  • Clear values, not confusion

For another example, see these contrasting situations:

When I was growing up, our family would visit our two aunts over the holidays. When my six brothers and sisters and I trooped in, one aunt would rush us downstairs. We were not allowed to come upstairs and had to be careful not to mess up her house. We hated going to her house. As a result, we always seemed to cause problems and misbehave. Our other aunt loved it when we came over. We could go anywhere, and she always had games for us to play. We liked going there and were well-mannered every time we did.

Therefore, the climate a manager creates sets the tone for employee engagement. Above all, it trumps the company culture.

Consistency Drives the High-Performance Formula

 To sum up, consistency in focus delivers great results. Any manager can do what is described occasionally. For instance, here are the signs that a manager’s behavior is inconsistent.

The High Performance Formula Drives Employee SuccessIn addition, are you committed to your team’s success? If so, see this complimentary eBook and guide: Coaching for Results.

Finally, do you want more ideas on how to inspire your team? Check this out this eBook-How to Motivate-NO-Inspire People.

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